yachtpaint.com Homepage
Forum Home Forum Home > General > Sailing
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - Bottom Paint for a dry sailed sailboat
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

Forum LockedBottom Paint for a dry sailed sailboat

 Post Reply Post Reply
Author
Message
Wayne View Drop Down
Newbie
Newbie
Avatar

Joined: 20 Feb 2011
Status: Offline
Points: 1
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Wayne Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Bottom Paint for a dry sailed sailboat
    Posted: 20 Feb 2011 at 3:30pm

I want to fix the bottom of my sailboat.  I use it for club racing a couple of times a week.  When not racing it sits on a trailer.  The previous owner had a habit of running it up on the rocks.  The bottom has some large gouges and some small sections missing all the way down to the glass.  There is also a lot of little dimples and two holes from where I replaced the bailers.  i'd also like to change the color from baby blue to orange.  What products will you suggest for filling the holes and gauges, primer, apoxy, and paint if necessary?

Wayne

Back to Top
Jay@Interlux View Drop Down
Moderator Group
Moderator Group
Avatar

Joined: 18 Jun 2010
Location: New Jersey
Status: Offline
Points: 1152
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Jay@Interlux Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 Feb 2011 at 9:42am
Hi Wayne,
The typical repair system for you to use to fix the bottom prior to painting would be below:
1. Wipe the surface down with Fiberglass Solvent Wash 202
2. Sand the surface with 80 grit paper
3. Remove all sanding residue with Fiberglass Solvent Wash 202
4. Fill all damaged areas with Watertite Epoxy Filler
5. Sand the Watertite with 80 grit paper
6. Remove all sanding residue with Fiberglass Solvent Wash 202
7. Apply 2 coats of InterProtect 2000E
8. Apply 3 coats of VC Performance Epoxy
 
You mentioned that you are looking for an orange bottom paint, unfortunately this is the one color which we do not have available nor would there be any to mix this color. The product which I have mentioned above would be the most optimal product for you to apply to the bottom of your sailboat as it was designed for boats which are trailered/rack stored/lift stored. The only challenge which you may have with this product would be that the VC Performance Epoxy is only available in white.
 
I apologize for any inconvenience and hope this helps.
Back to Top
GR View Drop Down
Newbie
Newbie
Avatar

Joined: 17 Jan 2012
Status: Offline
Points: 2
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote GR Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 Jan 2012 at 2:43pm
I have a similar situation with a dry sailed boat.  It does not have a lot of damage but it has many gelcoat blisters.  Most of the blisters have tiny hairline cracks.  Should I just sand the blisters flat and apply the Watertite? Or should I sand them down lower and fill back with epoxy?  They are mostly the size of the end of your finger and probably 3 or 4 per square foot on average. Thats a lot of filling.

Also, I saw you told someone else on another thread not to use the VC Perf on the deck or above the water line.  If I wanted the bottom and sides the same color could the different paints overlap?  Should I paint above the water line then the bottom or vice versa
Back to Top
Jay@Interlux View Drop Down
Moderator Group
Moderator Group
Avatar

Joined: 18 Jun 2010
Location: New Jersey
Status: Offline
Points: 1152
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Jay@Interlux Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 Jan 2012 at 3:31pm
Hi Gr,
If the blisters themselves are really surface blisters and have not penetrated down into the laminate below the gelcoat, then you would be just fine to follow the same system as mentioned above, which is:
1. Wipe the surface down with Fiberglass Solvent Wash 202
2. Sand the surface with 80 grit paper to open up all of the blisters
3. Remove all sanding residue with Fiberglass Solvent Wash 202
4. Fill all damaged areas with Watertite Epoxy Filler
5. Sand the Watertite with 80 grit paper
6. Remove all sanding residue with Fiberglass Solvent Wash 202
7. Apply 2 coats of InterProtect 2000E
8. Apply 3 coats of VC Performance Epoxy or 2-3 coats of your desired antifouling paint
 
However if the blisters were deeper, where they would have broken into the laminate, then it would be best for you to fill the areas with a clear epoxy resin first to seal the laminate off and then proceed along with the system mentioned above. This system would best be followed as:
1. Wipe the surface down with Fiberglass Solvent Wash 202
2. Sand the surface with 80 grit paper to open up all of the blisters
3. Seal the laminate off with 2-4 coats of a clear epoxy resin (maybe Epiglass or West System)
4. Wash the epoxy with warm soapy water and a stiff brush
5. Sand the epoxy with 120 grit paper
6. Remove all sanding residue with Fiberglass Solvent Wash 202
7. Fill all damaged areas with Watertite Epoxy Filler
8. Sand the Watertite with 80 grit paper
9. Remove all sanding residue with Fiberglass Solvent Wash 202
10. Apply 2 coats of InterProtect 2000E
11. Apply 3 coats of VC Performance Epoxy or 2-3 coats of your desired antifouling paint
 
As for the potential overlapping, if you are using a two component topside finish such as Perfection above the waterline, then I would have no issue with you applying the Perfection overtop of the VC Performance Epoxy or vice versa. However if you were using a one component topside finish such as Brightside above the waterline, then I would recommend that you only allow the Brightside to overlap the VC Performance Epoxy and not vice versa. The main reasoning would be the aggressive solvents which are in the VC Performance Epoxy will dissolve the Brightside if applied overtop, as where there will be very little to almost no adverse reaction if Brightside were applied overtop of the VC Performance Epoxy.
 
Hope this helps!
Back to Top
GR View Drop Down
Newbie
Newbie
Avatar

Joined: 17 Jan 2012
Status: Offline
Points: 2
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote GR Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 Jan 2012 at 10:43am
Thanks for your help.

I have decided not to paint the whole boat.  I am going to salvage the gelcoat by wet sanding and polishing.  The blisters don't look too bad after fairing them with paper.  They still have the small cracks but I plan on dry sailing it from now on.

My question now is about the boot stripe, which I would still like to paint.

What is the difference between Brightsides and Brightsides for boot stripes?  The boot stripe version does not have many colors.  Do I need a primer?
Back to Top
Jay@Interlux View Drop Down
Moderator Group
Moderator Group
Avatar

Joined: 18 Jun 2010
Location: New Jersey
Status: Offline
Points: 1152
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Jay@Interlux Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 Jan 2012 at 12:18pm
Sure not a problem at all for the help and glad we could assist. As for the difference between Brightside and Brightside Boottop and Striping Enamel, there is actually no difference at all, other then those 4 colors being available in half paint cans. We took the 4 most popular colors used for bootstripes and slightly revised the label. But other then that there would be no difference. As for the potential need for a primer, luckily this product can be applied directly to dewaxed/sanded/cleaned gelcoat. Therefore I would recommend that you apply a primer if there are any imperfections in the surface or if you simply wished to do so, otherwise I would recommend that you just proceed along without any primer.
 
Hope this helps!
Back to Top
Macrophage View Drop Down
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: 02 Dec 2013
Status: Offline
Points: 1
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Macrophage Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Dec 2013 at 9:46am
Hi I'm wondering if you can comment on the speed performance difference between VC Performance Epoxy and Fiberglass Bottomkote Aqua (or something similar) that has been carefully wet sanded.

I am going to paint the foils (gelcoat) on my sailboat and although speed is of utmost importance I was considering going with something that has a color other than white. Is the VC Performance Epoxy that much faster? Will there ever be colors available for it or would that detract from the quality of the finish? My boat is stored on land on a trailer so all I'm really looking for is a fast finish with the possibility of looking cool as well, of course! Thanks!
Back to Top
Ken@Interlux View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: 11 Mar 2013
Location: Union, NJ
Status: Offline
Points: 415
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Ken@Interlux Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Dec 2013 at 10:57am
Macrophage,
 
Fiberglass Bottomkote Aqua and VC Performance Epoxy all make exceptional racing finishes.  While I can't say for sure on the speed of the coating, VC Performance Epoxy is much harder, making it better suited for a dry sailed boat.  Also, VCPE will last much longer than Fiberglass Bottomkote Aqua, making is much better suited for your use overall.
 
Unfortunately, VC Performance Epoxy is only available in White, and we recommend adding any tints.  Tints will either be incompatible with the coating, or will act as a plasticizer, making the coating softer.
 
-Ken
Back to Top
ozprof View Drop Down
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: 04 Nov 2014
Status: Offline
Points: 1
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ozprof Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 Nov 2014 at 8:40am
Hi, I'm painting a dry-sailed boat and have found this forum helpful. I'm using Interprotect 2003 and VC Performance Epoxy. I have a couple of follow-up questions:
  • What the best roll and tip method? I've seen one recommendation to use a dry roller for tipping, while others say use a brush. 
  • The VC performance epoxy dries really fast, which makes tipping difficult. Is there some way to dilute the paint so it runs slightly more and dries a little more slowly?
  • What grit do you recommend to start wet sanding?

Back to Top
Guests View Drop Down
Guest Group
Guest Group
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 Nov 2014 at 9:37am
Originally posted by ozprof ozprof wrote:

Hi, I'm painting a dry-sailed boat and have found this forum helpful. I'm using Interprotect 2003 and VC Performance Epoxy. I have a couple of follow-up questions:
  • What the best roll and tip method? I've seen one recommendation to use a dry roller for tipping, while others say use a brush.
  • VC Performane Epoxy is designed for spray - there isn't a great roll/tip method. That being said, you're better off to avoid the "tipping" part all together and just put it on with a good, smooth (solvent-proof) foam roller. I use the white ones that look like white foam hot dogs, and just get them at Lowes or Home Depot. If you're going to wet sand, the tipping with a brush usually just makes it more difficult.
  • The VC performance epoxy dries really fast, which makes tipping difficult. Is there some way to dilute the paint so it runs slightly more and dries a little more slowly?
  • Again, that is due to its design for spray. You can thin it with 2316N, but keep in mind that may, depending on reduction amount, make each coat a little thinner than usual. You may want to put on 4 coats as opposed to 3 to help keep you from sanding thru the coats. I'd say no more than about 10% should be used to help the flow with a foam roller.
  • What grit do you recommend to start wet sanding?
  • You have to judge that based on the surface profile you're trying to smooth out. If you use a roller, I'd start out with 400 grit, and knock the tops off the roller stipple, then go to 600 and on up to your desired finish. I'll give you a tip to make it easier: Tape some paper up about 2 feet from where you need to sand, and spray a little black lacquer paint on your (cured!!!) VC Perf. Epoxy. Just a very light mist coat. This is called "guide coating", and will ensure that you don't sand too little or too much. You sand the boat, and when the black paint is gone, you're done to that point. When you want to go to the next finer grit, simply guide coat it again, and sand until that guide coat is gone...repeat as needed.

Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down



This page was generated in 0.047 seconds.