yachtpaint.com Homepage
Forum Home Forum Home > Repair & Maintenance > Antifouling
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - Recommendations needed
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

Recommendations needed

 Post Reply Post Reply
Author
Message
Jamey View Drop Down
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: 19 Feb 2012
Status: Offline
Points: 4
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Jamey Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Recommendations needed
    Posted: 19 Feb 2012 at 12:47pm
Hello,
My boat is a Boston Whaler outrage 26. I keep it docked in Saltwater from April thru December in Southern New Jersey. Winter storage is on blocks in my driveway. On occasion I take the boat up the Egg Harbor river into brackish and fresh water for a day trip, but mainly use it for fishing saltwater once or twice a week. I'm not sure what paint is on the hull right now, but it has poor adhesion to the primer, and approx 50% has come off with a pressure washer, so I have decided to strip it completely down to the primer.
My questions are:
1) What is the best paint for my application? Micron 66? Micron Extra?
2) Aside from sanding the old finish off down to to primer, are there any other preparations I need to do before applying the new paint? Should I clean the hull with 216 solvent and prime with primocon?
3) Is there a time limit on how long the boat can sit out of water after the paint is applied, before it is launched?
4) I have read that some use one color for first and second coats, and a different color for final coats, so you can see if the paint has worn off and needs to be recoated in the off season. Is this good practice? How many coats should I apply in total?
Thanks!
James


Edited by Jamey - 19 Feb 2012 at 12:49pm
Back to Top
Jay@Interlux View Drop Down
Moderator Group
Moderator Group
Avatar

Joined: 18 Jun 2010
Location: New Jersey
Status: Offline
Points: 1147
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Jay@Interlux Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Feb 2012 at 6:22pm
Hi Jamey,
Thanks for your interest in our products along with the information in which you had provided, it sure helps us to assist. Please see below, I have copied your questions and provided responses in red.

1) What is the best paint for my application? Micron 66? Micron Extra? Based off of the information which you have provided (location and frequency of use) I would recommend that you use Micron Extra versus Micron 66. Micron Extra will allow you to safely use the boat in all waters at all times, but will still polish away with use and eliminate paint build up as well. And based off of that information, I would recommend that you do not use Micron 66 as the occasional trips into the fresh water environments will likely prevent the the coating from working to it's maximum level of effectiveness and could very well cause the coating to soften, which in turn would result in detachment also.
2) Aside from sanding the old finish off down to to primer, are there any other preparations I need to do before applying the new paint? Should I clean the hull with 216 solvent and prime with primocon? Based off of the present condition of this unknown paint, I would recommend the following preparation:
1. Thoroughly sand the existing paint with 80 grit paper
2. Remove all sanding residue with Special Thinner 216
3. Apply 1 coat of Primocon
4. Apply 2-3 coats of Micron Extra
3) Is there a time limit on how long the boat can sit out of water after the paint is applied, before it is launched? Luckily, Micron Extra has no maximum immersion time or out of water time. Therefore you can apply the last coat of paint, wait a minimum of 16 hours and launch at any point after that.
4) I have read that some use one color for first and second coats, and a different color for final coats, so you can see if the paint has worn off and needs to be recoated in the off season. Is this good practice? How many coats should I apply in total? The process which you are referring to would be the application of a signal coat (aka guide coat). The biggest benefit of using this process would be that Micron Extra will be effective as long as the paint is showing on the surface. Therefore you will only be required to apply additional product when that signal coat is showing, rather then painting every season or two when it may not necessarily be required. If you wouldn't mind applying the additional product then I would absolutely recommend that you follow this process and it would be best to apply 1 coat of Micron Extra in a contrasting color and then apply and additional 2 coats of your final color.

Hope this helps!

Back to Top
Jamey View Drop Down
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: 19 Feb 2012
Status: Offline
Points: 4
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Jamey Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 Feb 2012 at 9:44pm
Thanks for your help Jay!
Back to Top
Jay@Interlux View Drop Down
Moderator Group
Moderator Group
Avatar

Joined: 18 Jun 2010
Location: New Jersey
Status: Offline
Points: 1147
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Jay@Interlux Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 Feb 2012 at 6:35am
Hi Jamey,
Sure not a problem at all and glad we could help!
Back to Top
Jamey View Drop Down
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: 19 Feb 2012
Status: Offline
Points: 4
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Jamey Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 Feb 2012 at 9:37am
Hi Jay,
More questions if you don't mind.
I have begun the tedious task of bottom paint removal with scraping, sanding with 80 grit discs on a pnuematic DA, and gelcoat safe chemical remover. In some area's, especially where sanding was done, I went all the way though the primer down to the fiberglass, or gelcoat. Today, I made the most progress with a small hand held scraper, which cleanly removed 90% of the paint on a lower section of the hull, and left the primer intact. My plan now is to remove all of the paint that I can with the scraper, and hit the stubborn areas with a soda blaster that I have ordered, and abort any sanding unless really necessary. The existing primer is opaque, with a light green tint. If I sand it there seems to be a gray primer under that. Obviously whatever paint was used over it did not adhere properly.
My questions are
1) Is it a good idea to leave the primer on there and simply scuff it before priming with Primocon, or should I go the extra mile and take it all off?
2) I noticed some companies, that are doing the farrow sytle paint removal, are coating with Interlux 2000E Barrier Coat, and then a few coats of the micron. Is this overkill in my case? Can/should the 2000E be used over the existing primer, or does it have to be completely removed?
3) If 2000E is suggested. What would be the steps now? 2000E, Primocon, Micron?
My Boston Whaler is a year 2000
 
Thanks for all of your help. I'm trying to do this job right the first time, and get the absolute most out of it.
Jamey


Edited by Jamey - 26 Feb 2012 at 3:49pm
Back to Top
Jay@Interlux View Drop Down
Moderator Group
Moderator Group
Avatar

Joined: 18 Jun 2010
Location: New Jersey
Status: Offline
Points: 1147
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Jay@Interlux Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 Feb 2012 at 12:22pm
Hi Jamey,
No worries at all for the additional questions, we don't mind one bit. Please see below, I have copied your questions and provided answers to each in red.
1) Is it a good idea to leave the primer on there and simply scuff it before priming with Primocon, or should I go the extra mile and take it all off? As long as that existing primer had been given a really good and thorough sanding with the 80 grit paper and the remaining finish is well adhered and intact, then it would be just fine for you to proceed right along with Primocon. However when/if sanding that existing primer and it happens to be quite soft/loose then I would recommend that you proceed with a complete removal before proceeding along.
2) I noticed some companies, that are doing the farrow sytle paint removal, are coating with Interlux 2000E Barrier Coat, and then a few coats of the micron. Is this overkill in my case? If you are looking for a full moisture barrier, then no using a process similar to this would not be overkill. However if you would prefer to salvage some of the coatings which are on the surface or have no intentions of applying a barrier coat system, then yes it would be considered overkill.
Can/should the 2000E be used over the existing primer, or does it have to be completely removed? Since we do not know what that existing primer would be, it would be best and recommended that you do not apply the InterProtect 2000E overtop as the solvents included would be far too aggressive and would likely end up dissolving that underlying primer, which would essentially create a far larger mess then you would ideally like to see.
3) If 2000E is suggested. What would be the steps now? 2000E, Primocon, Micron? If looking to simply salvage what is there and then paint then I would recommend Primocon and then Micron. However if you have slightly changed your mind and would prefer a full moisture system, then I would recommend that you completely remove any and all finishes then apply the InterProtect 2000E followed by the Micron.
 
Hope this helps!


Edited by Jay@Interlux - 28 Feb 2012 at 12:24pm
Back to Top
Jamey View Drop Down
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: 19 Feb 2012
Status: Offline
Points: 4
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Jamey Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 Mar 2012 at 7:31am
Thanks for the valuable information Jay!
I am almost finished with the prep work, and have ordered the Primocon and Micron Extra I will need.
Four more questions.
Since temperatures here will most likely be at the minimum of the acceptable range for applying the paint, 40 degrees to 50 degrees F, am I correct that I will be looking at drying times of 36 hours before recoating? In other words, one coat Primocon, wait 36 hours, next coat Micron, wait 36 hours, recoat Micron, wait 36 hours, etc, etc.
Since I am looking at long drying times, and my boat is outside, it is inevidable that some moisture and dirt may collect on the hull. Would it be ok to wipe the painted surface clean with Special Thinner before the next coat?
Lastly, I purchased one gallon of Primocon, probably enough to do more than one coat. Would I benefit from applying 2 coats of Primocon, before applying the Micron? Should the Primocon be applied as a thin coat, or more on the heavy side?
Do you have a recommended roller sleeve for applying the Primocon and the Micron? I was going to purchase some from the same place I ordered the paint, but the reviews were not so good, stating that the fibers on the short nap rollers were coming off into the paint.
 
Thanks Jay!


Edited by Jamey - 06 Mar 2012 at 7:38am
Back to Top
Jay@Interlux View Drop Down
Moderator Group
Moderator Group
Avatar

Joined: 18 Jun 2010
Location: New Jersey
Status: Offline
Points: 1147
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Jay@Interlux Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 Mar 2012 at 3:09pm
Hi Jamey,
You are most certainly welcome for the help and not a problem at all. Please see below I have copied your questions and provided answers to each which are visible in red.
Since temperatures here will most likely be at the minimum of the acceptable range for applying the paint, 40 degrees to 50 degrees F, am I correct that I will be looking at drying times of 36 hours before recoating? In other words, one coat Primocon, wait 36 hours, next coat Micron, wait 36 hours, recoat Micron, wait 36 hours, etc, etc. The Primocon will only need a drying time of 24 hours, however the Micron will in fact be 36 hours between coats, so you are pretty much correct.
 
Since I am looking at long drying times, and my boat is outside, it is inevidable that some moisture and dirt may collect on the hull. Would it be ok to wipe the painted surface clean with Special Thinner before the next coat? This would absolutely be plenty fine to do, just be sure to allow the 216 to evaporate for 45-60 minutes prior to beginning any painting.
 
Lastly, I purchased one gallon of Primocon, probably enough to do more than one coat. Would I benefit from applying 2 coats of Primocon, before applying the Micron? You can absolutely apply a 2nd coat of Primocon and have no negative/adverse effects, however and honestly a 2nd coat of Primocon will not really benefit you at all, as it will simply be a layer on the bottom and that's about it.
 
Should the Primocon be applied as a thin coat, or more on the heavy side? I would recommend that you apply a full coat of Primocon which were applied with a 3/8" nap roller which were solvent resistant.  
Do you have a recommended roller sleeve for applying the Primocon and the Micron? Unfortunately we do not recommend specific brands as there are so many out there and not all are available in all regions. However I would recommmend that you use a 3/8" nap roller which is solvent resistant. These can typically be found at the marine dealers or even a local hardware store.
 
Hope this helps some more!
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down



This page was generated in 0.203 seconds.